Search
  • Serif and Sans

How to Address Wedding Invitation Envelopes

Step 1. Identify the Inner and Outer Envelopes Some invitations come with just an outer mailing envelope and some come with an inner envelope and outer mailing envelope. The inner envelope is slightly smaller with an un-gummed flap and it’s used for indicating exactly who is invited to the wedding. See examples for addressing both the inner and outer envelopes below.


Step 2. Who will address your envelopes? Some couples choose a calligrapher for an ultra sophisticated look. Some people like to do digital guest addressing. This is where you email a spreadsheet of your guest names and addresses and it is printed on the front of the envelope in the same font to match your wedding invitations. Many couples will address the envelopes themselves or enlist some help. Remember, whoever handwrites the addresses needs to have good handwriting.


Step 3. Take Your Time! Digital guest addressing is normally the fastest and easiest way to address your envelopes and you normally get a proof of each envelope to triple check for any errors. Remember though, how you have the names and addresses typed in your spreadsheet is exactly how it will appear on the envelope. Calligraphers can need a few weeks or more depending on how many invitations they’re addressing. If you’re addressing your own envelopes, give yourself a couple days to a week. Do not cram 200+ invitations into a day! Your hand will get tired, you’ll get bored and the addresses will start to get sloppy.


Step 4. Order Extra Envelopes Make sure you order extra envelopes with your wedding invitations, especially if you are hand writing them or using a calligrapher. No matter how hard you try not to make errors, it happens so be prepared and have extra envelopes ready. If you need to order more envelopes that can sometimes take up to 2 weeks.



Formal Addressing Etiquette Rules: Use formal names (no nicknames).

Middle names aren't necessary, but must be spelled out if used (no initials).

Spell out all words such as Apartment, Avenue, Street, etc.

Use the two-letter abbreviation. Abbreviate Mr., Mrs., Ms. and Jr.

Address envelopes to both members of a married couple, husband first.

Address envelopes to unmarried couples with each of their names on a separate line.

List the family member or closest friend first.

Write out professional titles such as Doctor or Professor.

Avoid using “and family” on formal invitations.

Send separate invitations to children over 18.

Write “and Guest” if a guest is allowed.


Inner Envelope Addressing Examples: Single Guest Ms. Jones


Married Couple Mr. and Mrs. Edward


Married Couple with Different Names Ms. Jamie Sperla

Mr. Danniel Adams

Unmarried Couple at Same Address Ms. Jessica Mildred Mr. Ken O'Neil


A Family Mr. and Mrs. Hollingsworth Emily, Grace and Jack

Outer Envelope Addressing Examples: Single Guest Ms. Rebecca Jones

140 Blackstone Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts 02115


Married Couple Mr. and Mrs. David Edward 140 Blackstone Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts 02115


Married Couple with Different Names Ms. Jamie Sperla & Mr. Danniel Adams

140 Blackstone Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts 02115


Unmarried Couple at Same Address Ms. Jessica Mildred

Mr. Ken O'Neil 140 Blackstone Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts 02115


Family Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hollingsworth Emily, Grace and Jack 140 Blackstone Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts 02115


16 views
  • Instagram-icon
  • FACEBOOK
  • PINTEREST
  • THE KNOT
  • WEDDING WIRE

Custom wedding invitations that combine luxury with tradition

 

katie@serif-sans.com

 

©2020 Serif and Sans | Boston, Massachusetts